Home About us Current issue Ahead of Print Back issues Submission Instructions Advertise Contact Login   

Search Article 
  
Advanced search 
 
Saudi Journal of Kidney Diseases and Transplantation
Users online: 616 Home Bookmark this page Print this page Email this page Small font sizeDefault font size Increase font size 

REVIEW ARTICLE Table of Contents   
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 32  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 1511-1522
Dietary Acid Load and Chronic Kidney Disease


1 Student Research Committee; Nutrition Research Center, Department of Clinical Nutrition, School of Nutrition and Food Sciences, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran
2 Nutrition Research Center, Department of Clinical Nutrition, School of Nutrition and Food Sciences, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran; Division of Nephrology and Hypertension at the Lundquist Institute at Harbor-UCLA Center Torrance, California, USA, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Maryam Ekramzadeh
Nutrition Research Center, Department of Clinical Nutrition, School of Nutrition and Food Sciences, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.
Iran
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1319-2442.352409

Rights and Permissions

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a condition in which kidneys are damaged and can not function well, so this leads to the aggregation of excessive fluid and waste products in the blood. The acidity and alkalinity of urine are affected by our daily diet. Dietary proteins, especially amino acids containing sulfur (e.g., methionine and cysteine), are the major determinants of the dietary acid load because they can produce sulfate due to oxidation. Diet can affect the excreted acidity through the kidneys to maintain the acid-base balance. Diets with animal protein content contain more precursor acids than basic precursors compared to fruits and vegetables that produce more acid in the body than animal proteins and dramatically affect CKD and its progression. Acid-producing diets can cause high blood pressure through the kidneys, causing the production of the hormones angiotensin II, endothelin-1, and aldosterone. Metabolic acidosis can cause CKD and reduced bone tissue.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article  Email this article
    

  Similar in PUBMED
    Search Pubmed for
    Search in Google Scholar for
   Citation Manager
  Access Statistics
   Reader Comments
   Email Alert *
   Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed2859    
    Printed78    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded636    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal